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6 places where buying a Coke hasn’t always been easy

Liyna Anwar Sep 27, 2013

So where is Coke officially bought and sold? Well, lots of places. But some markets have been tougher to crack than others.

1. Myanmar – Because of U.S. trade sanctions, Coca-Cola stayed away from the South Asian country. The company came back in 2012 for the first time in 60 years. In June of this year, Coke opened up a bottling plant outside the city of Yangon. The drink giant is pouring in about $200 million in Myanmar over the next 5 years. 

2. Vietnam – Coca-Cola was one of the first companies to rush in (along with Pepsi) after a 19-year US trade embargo was lifted in 1994. The company initially arrived in Vietnam in 1960, but when South Vietnam collapsed, the company left. Last year, Coke announced it would be investing $300 million in the nation through 2015. 

3. India – After a long absence, Coca-Cola returned to India in 1993 following the country’s decision to loosen its foreign investment rules. In the same year, Coke bought Parle Group, the company that produces the popular Indian cola, Thums Up. And last year, Coke revived RimZim, a soda flavored with cumin. 

4. East Germany – In February 1990, Coca-Cola introduced its beverages to East Germans for the first time and announced a $140 million investment program. 

5. Russia – Coca-Cola began selling its Fanta product here in 1979, but it wasn’t until 1987 that state-owned plants started bottling Coke.

6. China – In 1979, Coca-Cola started selling its products in China after it was selected as the only company allowed to sell packaged cold drinks in the country. 

And the only two places in the world you still can’t buy Coca-Cola legally? North Korea and Cuba. 

Click here to listen to our conversation with Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent about water, obesity, and female entrepreneurs. 

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