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The road of recovery

Kai Ryssdal Jul 25, 2013
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This is day two of President Obama’s economic road show. Jacksonville, Fla., was today’s stop. His message is for Congress — even though he’s talking, in theory, to “real people” as he gets out and about.

We figured it’d be a good idea to check in with a “real” person we know and talk to from time to time: Trucker Don Holzschuh. We got him the way we usually do, on a cell phone off the side of a highway somewhere. This time, he was in Charles City, Iowa.

Obama spoke in Illinois yesterday about the economy and the middle class, but Holzschuh says he wasn’t impressed.

“I liked the campaign speech — that’s all it was. It was kind of disappointing,” he says.

Holzschuh says he’s not seeing the economy getting better. Three stores he delivers to on his route went out of business, which means his wages are going down and he’s feeling the pinch.

“It’s the same old same old … I hate to say this, the people up at top, including the president — they don’t know anything about work, about what working people are going through, the middle class,” he says. “They just don’t understand what work is.”

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