Letters: Opting out of solicitations, credit cards for teens

Tess Vigeland Oct 26, 2012
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Listen to advice on where to find accredited credit counselors, where to go to opt out of getting credit card solicitations, and when to introduce your kids to credit. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Letters: Opting out of solicitations, credit cards for teens

Tess Vigeland Oct 26, 2012
Listen to advice on where to find accredited credit counselors, where to go to opt out of getting credit card solicitations, and when to introduce your kids to credit. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
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Food for thought: Your letters on the dangers of genetically modified foods (listeners pointed out that testing on GMOs is still happening), whether to get tattoos, and advice on where to find accredited credit counselors. Hint: Here’s where you should go.

“Go with the accredited ones. Don’t pay money upfront,” advises David Lazarus, consumer columnist at the L.A. Times.

David also has advice on how to avoid the delude of credit card applications that anyone with a decent credit score seems to get. He says the best way is to go to OptOutPreescreen.com, a one-stop shopping service offered by all the credit agencies. There are options at the website for a five-year opt out and a permanent opt out from receiving any credit card solicitations. You will have to give your Social Security number to do this — which David advises because it’s worth it.

And here’s a link to the fee-only financial planning association recommended by Jill Schlesinger from CBS/MoneyWatch: http://www.napfa.org/

Click on the audio player for more advice, including when you should introduce your kid to the world of credit.

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