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Advantage Adidas

Ashley Milne-Tyte Jun 26, 2006
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Advantage Adidas

Ashley Milne-Tyte Jun 26, 2006
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TEXT OF STORY

SCOTT JAGOW: Wimbledon starts today and already Adidas is a winner. The company has temporarily won a legal battle over the clothing worn by major tennis stars. Adidas gets to keep its three-stripe design on the outfits. Here’s Ashley Milne-Tyte:

ASHLEY MILNE-TYTE: The final victor will emerge only after the case goes to court in October.

Adidas claims its three stripes on shirt sleeves and shorts are a design element, not a logo.

Paul Swangard directs the Warsaw sports marketing center at the University of Oregon. He says it’s no wonder Adidas is putting up a fight.

PAUL SWANGARD:“It comes down to millions and millions of dollars and the exposure that comes from having an athlete perform in that corporate moniker, and you know if they can protect their interests they’ll bring the lawyers in because that’s what they’re good at.”

Swangard thinks in the end Adidas will have to relinquish its stripes on tennis clothing.

He says they give the brand clear recognition advantage over its rivals — exactly what the tennis bodies are trying to prevent.

I’m Ashley Milne-Tyte for Marketplace.

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