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Registered traveler program debuts

Amy Scott Jun 19, 2006
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Registered traveler program debuts

Amy Scott Jun 19, 2006
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TEXT OF STORY

TESS VIGELAND: The Transportation Security Administration rolls out its long-awaited registered traveler program tomorrow. But as Marketplace’s Amy Scott tells us, the program is expected to debut not with a bang, but a thud.

AMY SCOTT: If you want to take advantage of the new registered traveler program, you’d better be flying out of Orlando. It’s the only airport expected to be up and running by tomorrow’s official launch.

Logan airport in Boston recently abandoned the program. Officials say the benefits aren’t worth the $100 cost to users. Indianapolis is delaying its roll-out reportedly because TSA has yet to release its final guidelines.

Joe Brancatelli runs a Web site for business travelers.

JOE BRANCATELLI: There is no tangible benefit being promised by the government. Without a tangible benefit, no business traveler’s going to sign up for a pig in the poke.

The 25,000 travelers signed up in Orlando still have to clear a standard screening. But they get their own lane.

Airports are under pressure from the airlines to reject similar programs. The airline lobby has written letters to 150 airport directors saying the program is an unnecessary drain on resources.

In New York, I’m Amy Scott for Marketplace.

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