Marketplace PM for September 5, 2006
Sep 5, 2006

Marketplace PM for September 5, 2006

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Segments From this episode

Striking oil in the Gulf

Sep 5, 2006
Three oil companies today announced a major oil discovery in the Gulf of Mexico. The deep-water well may be one of the biggest finds in recent years — and could boost U.S. oil and gas reserves by 50 percent. Sarah Gardner reports.

BP gets an ombudsman

Sep 5, 2006
British oil giant BP has appointed a former U.S. District Judge to act as a company ombudsman who will hear complaints from BP workers in Alaska and elsewhere. Stephen Beard reports.

Education myths 101

Sep 5, 2006
Millions of kids have gone off to college for the fall. As some of us face empty nests, all of us should face some empty promises about American higher education says author and commentator Beth Shulman.

Dunkin' Donuts escalates java wars

Sep 5, 2006
Coffee sales are so profitable that the java giants are thinking big. Dunkin' Donuts plans to triple its number of stores, stepping up the competition for a certain Seattle-based coffee specialist. Steve Tripoli has the story.

Ford names new CEO

Sep 5, 2006
The automaker announced this afternoon that Bill Ford, Jr. — Henry's great-grandson — will step down from its top job. Host Kai Ryssdal talks to Micheline Maynard of the New York Times about the development.

Pensions vs. 401ks

Sep 5, 2006
A study out today says the much-maligned pension still has many benefits over 401k accounts. Turns out pensions have lower fees and better financial performance. Hillary Wicai reports.

Can parking tickets measure corruption?

Sep 5, 2006
Many developing — and some developed — nations have reputations for corruption. Turns out parking ticket data may serve as a good measure of just how corrupt. Undercover Economist Tim Harford explains.

Blank check IPOs are back

Sep 5, 2006
More companies are raising money on Wall Street these days without telling investors what they plan to do with it. It's not illegal, but there's word today regulators are looking into the practice. Amy Scott reports.