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Marketplace PM for September 26, 2006
Sep 26, 2006

Marketplace PM for September 26, 2006

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Segments From this episode

Health care costs <i>only</i> double inflation

Sep 26, 2006
It's no surprise that health insurance costs are going up, but at least last year's 7.7% jump is the lowest increase in seven years. That's according to an annual survey out today. Helen Palmer reports.

IBM putting patent apps online

Sep 26, 2006
The nation's largest patent holder, IBM has announced it will begin publishing its patent applications on the Web for public review &mdash; a move that could affect the entire patent system. Janet Babin reports.

Google issues power supply challenge

Sep 26, 2006
Search leader Google today urged the high-tech industry to stop wasting so much energy, calling on computer-makers to come up with a more efficient standard power supply for PCs. Sarah Gardner reports.

Chaos as business plan

Sep 26, 2006
Google expends a lot of human energy on products that don't always make it. Host Kai Ryssdal talks to Fortune Magazine's Adam Lashinsky about the company's strategy that embraces risk and failure.

Fastow sentence reduced

Sep 26, 2006
A federal judge went easy on former Enron CFO Andrew Fastow today, reducing his plea bargained prison sentence from 10 years to just six for his role in that company's collapse. It pays to cooperate, Amy Scott reports.

We've got mail

Sep 26, 2006
We know, we know . . . Al Gore used Apple's Keynote in "An Inconvenient Truth." Host Kai Ryssdal shares that and some of the other letters we've received in the past few weeks.

Losing the war on drugs in Afghanistan

Sep 26, 2006
A militant insurgency and the drug trade are pretty much the only industries thriving in Afghanistan now. U.N. figures show opium production there more than doubled last year to the highest level ever recorded. Miranda Kennedy reports.