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Marketplace PM for November 10, 2006
Nov 10, 2006

Marketplace PM for November 10, 2006

Stories You Might Like U.K. budget watchdog meets with PM The economics of kidnapping Public transit can help with climate change — if there’s buy-in Fleece power vests are big business The costs of living in an oil-based economy Italy’s government close to collapse as PM resigns

Segments From this episode

U.S. automakers assemble better reviews

Nov 10, 2006
Consumer Reports is out with its annual car reliability survey. And U.S. automakers are coming up fast in the rearview mirror. Marketplace's Steve Tripoli reports.

It's become a matter of convention

Nov 10, 2006
Fan cons, like those attracting Star Trek followers, are a big part of the $4 billion consumer-show business. Joal Ryan reports on how the TV show took that industry where it had never gone before.

You can't always get what you want . . .

Nov 10, 2006
But you just might find you get what you need. That's what Rolling Stones fan and commentator Graham Thomas Shelby discovered recently when deciding whether to pay to see the band in concert.

Land of rising competition

Nov 10, 2006
Japanese brands, once synonymous with quality and efficiency, have been having problems of late with recalls and getting products to market on time. Marketplace's Lisa Napoli reports on what's gone wrong.

Thirsty for power

Nov 10, 2006
Five Arab states have expressed an intention to embark on civil nuclear power programs. Is this just sensible economics, or something more sinister? Stephen Beard reports.

Russia expected to join WTO

Nov 10, 2006
The U.S. and Russia announced a long-awaited trade deal that should allow Russia to join the World Trade Organization, and provide new investment opportunities and customers for U.S. exporters. John Dimsdale reports.

Call off the auditors!

Nov 10, 2006
The Securities and Exchange Commission will give the business lobby what it's been waiting for, a softer version of one of the toughest post-Enron reforms. Marketplace's Amy Scott explains.