Businesses adapt to the pandemic by moving online

Alli Fam Apr 23, 2020
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Susan Estes and Steve Brown, a clown duo from NYC. Courtesy Susan Estes

Businesses adapt to the pandemic by moving online

Alli Fam Apr 23, 2020
Susan Estes and Steve Brown, a clown duo from NYC. Courtesy Susan Estes
HTML EMBED:
COPY

When businesses had to close their doors in March to slow the spread of COVID-19, they were forced to confront to a new reality. For many, it involved a pivot to the digital world. But the shift from in-person to digital isn’t always easy — some services just don’t translate well to the internet.

Susan Estes and her husband, Steve Brown, are children’s entertainers in New York City. The duo usually performs at birthday parties, schools and libraries. By mid-March, all their bookings had cancelled.

Brown is very tech savy, so the technical part wasn’t too hard. But “adapting is a very scary thing” Estes said, explaining that her and her husband “flourish in front of a live audience.”

Marc Greenstein, a primary care physician in the Fort Lauderdale, Florida, area, closed his practice on March 17. In the days that followed, Greenstein developed a website and telehealth platform.

He says he enjoys working digitally — it gives him the opportunity to spend more time with his family. While the shift online is helping to tide him over until reopening, he is still taking a financial hit.

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