What Maine’s “elder boom” means for the rest of the country

Kimberly Adams, Jonaki Mehta, and Rose Conlon Aug 20, 2019
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John Moore/Getty Images

What Maine’s “elder boom” means for the rest of the country

Kimberly Adams, Jonaki Mehta, and Rose Conlon Aug 20, 2019
John Moore/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

It’s no secret that the U.S. population is aging. As baby boomers reach retirement, some elder care resources are beginning to feel stretched thin.

Maine, which has the oldest population in the country, is experiencing a dire shortage of workers that can provide care to the state’s elderly residents.

What’s happening in Maine might be a taste of what’s to come for the rest of the country, says Jeff Stein, economic policy reporter for the Washington Post. He spoke with Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams about Maine’s “elder boom” and the economic consequences of a caregiver shortage.

Click the audio player above to hear the conversation.

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