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Marketplace Morning Report

When the vapes go out in The City

Jun 25, 2019

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Politics Inside Out

The election hangover

Kai Ryssdal and Andrea Seabrook Nov 9, 2016
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Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton watch televised coverage of the US presidential election at Comet Tavern in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seattle, Washington, on November 8, 2016.
JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images

President Barack Obama made one public prediction before the election: That the sun would rise on November 9 regardless of who won. What he didn’t say was the sun would illuminate an America that’s much different than many people thought it was. 

Marketplace’s Washington Bureau Chief Andrea Seabrook breaks it down in the latest installment of “Politics Inside Out”: 

There is so much about this election that is shocking for so many reasons– the polls, the media and this and that – but really what we need to look at it as is a reflection of ourselves. If there are that many people in our country who didn’t know that a huge center of our population feels completely disenfranchised – like it is outside of the whole system – well then that says something about the people who thought that. It says something about how much we are able to ignore. It says something about the privilege of thinking you’re sticking up for people who are disenfranchised but actually ignoring some sectors of that. And that’s not to say that the people who voted for Trump were the least fortunate among us, that’s certainly not true, but they are the people who have gained but have gained the slowest and have not been in many ways the focus of Wall Street or Washington or our culture for many years.

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