Why Uber execs may get away with their bad behavior

Tracey Samuelson Nov 18, 2014
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Why Uber execs may get away with their bad behavior

Tracey Samuelson Nov 18, 2014
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Uber has become known for questionable corporate behavior. The latest example is an incident in which a senior executive at the company suggested spending a million dollars to investigate the personal lives of journalists, in particular one female reporter who’s been critical of the company.

But will the bad behavior affect the company’s bottom line?

Robert Sutton, a professor of management science and engineering at Stanford University, says it’s unlikely and consumers don’t seem unduly concerned. But Karen North, a clinical professor at the USC Annenberg School of Communications, thinks Uber’s profits could suffer if the company burns through the trust it has built with customers.

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