What have you always wondered about the economy? Tell Us
Screen Wars

‘Breaking Bad’ and Albuquerque: One year later

Kai Ryssdal Sep 29, 2014
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Screen Wars

‘Breaking Bad’ and Albuquerque: One year later

Kai Ryssdal Sep 29, 2014
HTML EMBED:
COPY

AMC’s critically acclaimed series “Breaking Bad,” created by Vince Gilligan, ran its very last episode one year ago. The show takes place in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and although production has stopped, the town continues to experience an economic boom. Even tourism rates grew exponentially.

In 2013, New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez signed what was called the “Breaking Bad bill” into law, a film incentive that increases subsidies for television crews from 25 percent to 30 percent in some areas of expenditure. The law increases New Mexico’s rebate for series television production to 30 percent of a producer’s total qualified spend in the state.

“We actually see people that will come here specifically to go and see the sites,” says Albuquerque mayor Richard Berry. “I have been as far as Beijing where people have asked me about ‘Breaking Bad,’ so, yeah, it surely has put us on the map internationally.”

Another positive outcome was the number of jobs the show produced. Actors and television producers weren’t the only ones to benefit job-wise from filming, Berry says.

“It’s electricians, the lumber yard selling lumber, and it is craft, and it is the local places that rent their businesses out to film,” says Berry. “It really hits our economy from top to bottom.”

“Breaking Bad” has a spinoff show called “Better Call Saul,” also created by Gilligan, and also set in Albuquerque. It is scheduled to premiere in February 2015.

The show has already been picked up for a second season.

 “When ‘Breaking Bad’ filmed here, almost $70 million came into our economy,” says Berry. “We think that ‘Better Call Saul’ is going to be another great opportunity for us.”

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.