Congress considers hacker tactics to fight against cyber criminals

Molly Wood May 29, 2013
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Congress considers hacker tactics to fight against cyber criminals

Molly Wood May 29, 2013
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Chinese hackers have gained access to advanced weapon systems here in the U.S, according to a report out yesterday. Now, that hacked information might be used to copy or even disable those weapon systems.

It’s a problem that isn’t likely to go away soon, as the companies that design and make our weapons are increasingly interconnected through the web. So how should they defend themselves against cyberattacks?

One answer is to hack right back. The Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property is recommending Congress allow companies to use some of the criminals’ tools to fight fire with fire online.

“If it’s your information, you ought to be able to have the means available to prevent another from exploiting it,” says Roy Kamphausen, who co-authored the report.

Kamphausen fully admits that using hackers’ tools against them might be a dangerous game. But he also said technology is moving a lot faster than the legislative process — and that’s a big problem for defending against online crime.

To hear more about the report and the tactics detailed from cybersecurity expert Chester Wisniewski, click on the audio player above.

We’re here to help you navigate this changed world and economy.

Our mission at Marketplace is to raise the economic intelligence of the country. It’s a tough task, but it’s never been more important.

In the past year, we’ve seen record unemployment, stimulus bills, and reddit users influencing the stock market. Marketplace helps you understand it all, will fact-based, approachable, and unbiased reporting.

Generous support from listeners and readers is what powers our nonprofit news—and your donation today will help provide this essential service. For just $5/month, you can sustain independent journalism that keeps you and thousands of others informed.