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Weather Economy

New York imposes gas rationing to ease Sandy shortage

Dan Bobkoff Nov 9, 2012
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Weather Economy

New York imposes gas rationing to ease Sandy shortage

Dan Bobkoff Nov 9, 2012
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Gas rationing is back in New York City and parts of Long Island. And — like in the 1970s oil crisis — cars that end in an even number fill up on even days, and odd plates on odd days.

The rationing plan was announced just yesterday, which is why some drivers haven’t yet gotten the memo. When asked early this morning if he was trying to beat the rationing that began at 6am, Aminul Islam, asked, “rationing?”

Others like Eva Jakubowski were up early. She has to get to Pennsylvania today, but her license plate ends in an even number.

“I’m hoping they’re not going to turn me away at 6am because I have an ‘8’ at the end of my license plate,” she says.

Drivers waited anywhere from 30 minutes to two hours to fill up at this station on Manhattan’s west side. A team of cops kept things orderly.

Gas rationing has been in place in New Jersey for about a week. It came Friday to New York City and parts of Long Island because supplies just haven’t come back fast enough in the Northeast.

Hurricane Sandy knocked out refineries and parts of the distribution network. The nor’easter this week didn’t help matters either. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg says the gas shortage could last another couple of weeks.

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