Codebreaker

Looking for a job? You need to pass the robot test first.

Marc Sanchez Sep 4, 2012

A few weeks back, Eric Auld wanted to see how many people he was competing with for jobs he saw posted on Craigslist. After creating a fake ad, it turns out the answer is A LOT – 653 resumes in just 24 hours. Lots of responders used cut and paste methods and generic resumes that would have been flagged had Auld been a robot. “First looks” are becoming increasingly more digital as the BBC reports on the new digital trends companies are employing to, uh… employ you. The Chemistry Group customizes a kind of role playing game for companies and their applicants. The game might start out mundane, with the user (applicant) enjoying a day in the park, but then distractions set in. A bird circles. Emails pop up. And maybe somebody else starts to ask you questions. The game is set up to judge your multi-tasking skills.

From the BBC:

It is just one of a new breed of software that reflects the growing impact of the digital age on the recruitment sector.
Another programme, created by talent management firm SHL, features online 3D simulations, which drop graduate applicants into scenarios where a boss with a piercing stare asks for solutions to various dilemmas.

And don’t forget the keywords. For years, companies have been employing software that searches resumes for keywords that relate to specific jobs. It’s such a common practice, in fact, that people try to game the system.

Again from the BBC:

As flexible working and virtual teams become more prevalent, so does the opportunity to pull the wool over an electronic recruiter’s eyes.

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