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Fallout: The Financial Crisis

A hopeful generation down the road

Tess Vigeland Oct 10, 2008
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Ron Settle's third period econ class at a high school in St. Louis, MO. Tess Vigeland
Fallout: The Financial Crisis

A hopeful generation down the road

Tess Vigeland Oct 10, 2008
Ron Settle's third period econ class at a high school in St. Louis, MO. Tess Vigeland
HTML EMBED:
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TEXT OF INTERVIEW

Bill Radke: For the last 10 days, we’ve been hitting the road to find out how Americans are dealing with this economic crisis. Our series is called Road to Ruin. Our Tess Vigeland has reached the end of her journey. She’s in St. Louis and joins us now. Tess, did you find on the road?

Tess Vigeland: You know Bill, I think the biggest surprise that I’ve found is that despite all the headlines, even what you’re seeing today with markets all over the world taking a nose dive, that people in general — yes, there are pockets of grave concern and people losing their jobs, but they are not watching what’s going on in the world banking system and feeling that it’s having an effect on them — yet. You know, this may turn out to be something that really trickles down and people find it hard to get credit, but right now they’re still getting solicitations in the mail for new credit cards. So it really has been very surprising to hear the optimism that doesn’t quite seem to fit with the panic we’re seeing elsewhere.

Radke: Who’s someone you met that’ll always stay with you?

Vigeland: I would have to say the junior/senior econ class at a high school here in Missouri that I visited here yesterday morning. Lots of very smart kids who are very up on what’s going on in the news. And it was very heartening to see that the younger generation is paying attention, and perhaps will use the lessons of these days and months to try to help avoid this happening again.

Radke: Tess Vigeland on the Road to Ruin with some hope there in St. Louis. Thank you, Tess.

Vigeland: Thanks, Bill.

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