Will directors’ deal help end WGA strike?

Marketplace Staff Jan 18, 2008
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Will directors’ deal help end WGA strike?

Marketplace Staff Jan 18, 2008
HTML EMBED:
COPY

TEXT OF STORY

Doug Krizner: There might not be a lot of new material on TV, but the plot in the writers’ strike has a new twist: The film directors’ union and the major studios have reached a tentative contract.

And as Renita Jablonski reports, it puts pressure on the writers to reach an agreement.


Renita Jablonski: Now that producers have a deal with the directors’ union, an olive branch is going out to the writers’ union. Patrick Verrone is president of Writers Guild of America West. He says he’s ready to forgive, but not forget how the last round of talks broke down in December.

Patrick Verrone: You know, we’ve been looking to bargain with the conglomerates now for over a month — they walked away from the table. We’re still willing, ready and able to bargain with them.

Writers want more money for movies and TV shows that end up on the Internet. The directors’ deal includes higher residuals for online video. The hope is the contract can be a template for a new WGA contract. Verrone says it’s too soon to start writing a happy ending.

Verrone: We have to look at the contract. We aren’t going to be overly optimistic or pessimistic at this time.

The writers strike is entering its 11th week. Hollywood’s waiting to see whether it’ll be able to dress up for the Oscars next month. I’m Renita Jablonski for Marketplace.

There’s a lot happening in the world.  Through it all, Marketplace is here for you. 

You rely on Marketplace to break down the world’s events and tell you how it affects you in a fact-based, approachable way. We rely on your financial support to keep making that possible. 

Your donation today powers the independent journalism that you rely on. For just $5/month, you can help sustain Marketplace so we can keep reporting on the things that matter to you.  

Need some Econ 101?

Our new Marketplace Crash Course is here to help. Sign-up for free, learn at your own pace.