Globalization’s a love-hate affair

Sarah Gardner Apr 26, 2007
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Globalization’s a love-hate affair

Sarah Gardner Apr 26, 2007
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MARK AUSTIN THOMAS: What’s your reaction when you hear the word globalization? A new poll out this morning on WorldPublicOpinion.org says most people globally have a love/hate relationship with the word. Some think it’s good for the economy while others think it hurts the environment. From the Sustainability Desk Sarah Gardner has more.


SARAH GARDNER: The results of the polling in 18 countries show enthusiastic support for globalization. Not surprisingly, it’s especially strong in exporting countries like China and South Korea.

Many around the globe believe it’s been good for their economies, although 42 percent in the U.S. disagreed with that notion. Globalization and the environment, however, was another story.

STEVEN KULL: The environment was the one area where there was the most ambivalence about the impact of trade.

WorldPublicOpinion editor Steven Kull says the French and the Americans were the most negative about global trade’s environmental effects. And even in China a majority want minimum environmental standards included in trade agreements.

KULL: The people themselves are really looking for the international system to put pressure on their own countries.

Americans surveyed in this poll were decidedly mixed about global trade. They were most worried about the effect on U.S. jobs.

I’m Sarah Gardner for Marketplace.

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