Marketplace AM for May 10, 2006

Episode Description 

Sarbanes-Oxley powwow

Business leaders and economists gather in Washington today to weigh in on proposals to loosen strict new accounting standards for most US businesses. Amy Scott reports.
Posted In: Washington

eBay meets TV advertising

Efforts are underway to replace the age-old "upfront market" for TV advertising with an eBay-inspired system in which marketers would bid online to place ads on different networks and time slots. Jeff Tyler reports.
Posted In: Science

Increased dependence on foreign ethanol?

President Bush and House Majority Leader John Boehner have proposed relaxing tariffs on foreign ethanol to help reduce gasoline prices. But it won't be an easy sell to Corn Belt lawmakers. Curt Nickisch reports.
Posted In: Canada, Washington

AOL lays off call center workers

Looks like Web surfers don't need the hand-holding they used to. AOL announced Tuesday it was laying off 7% of its workforce, largely because help requests at its call centers have declined. Alex Cohen has more.
Posted In: Science

Will the Internet stay fast and cheap?

Commentator Robert Reich argues the very idea of a democratic Internet is threatened by the so-called net neutrality bill working its way through Congress.

Pesticide pioneers

Biopesticides are the fastest-growing segment of the pesticide market, touted as a less toxic alternative. One California company is determined to show that "nature's chemistry" can make money...at least, one day. Sarah Gardner reports.

Gold makes history

The price of gold hit a 25-year high in overseas trading today, rising well above $700 an ounce. From London, Stephen Beard reports that speculation about the future of China's massive foreign reserves is driving the rise.
Posted In: Canada, Economy, Wall Street

Tax cut extension

Congressional Republicans agreed to pass $70 billion in tax cut extensions Tuesday despite criticism the move could worsen the federal budget deficit. Tess Vigeland reports.
Posted In: Washington

China labeled a currency manipulator?

American manufacturers hope the Treasury Department uses those words in reference to China in a report to Congress today about countries that don't allow their currencies to float on the open market. John Dimsdale reports.
Posted In: Economy, Washington

Spoon-Fed on Wall Street

Ahead of today's Federal Reserve meeting, Cheryl Glaser reports new Fed chief Ben Bernanke may have learned his lesson about speaking too freely about US monetary policy.
Posted In: Economy, Wall Street