Based in Washington, David Gura is a senior reporter for Marketplace, the public radio business and economics program, and since 2013, he also has been the show’s primary substitute host.

During his tenure at Marketplace, Gura has filed dispatches from the White House, the Capitol, and the Supreme Court. He has covered the implementation of healthcare and financial reform, and he has been a trusted guide to listeners through countless political crises, including budget battles, showdowns and shutdowns.

Gura has also traveled widely. After the financial crisis, he reported on the economic recovery, and ahead of the 2012 and 2014 elections, he spent a lot of time talking to Americans in places that were both electorally and economically unique. In 2013, after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, in Newtown, Conn., he spent several months as the lead reporter on a series called “Guns and Dollars,” about the U.S. firearms industry.

Previously, Gura worked at NPR, first as an editor and a producer, then as a reporter for The Two-Way, its breaking news blog. In addition, he regularly contributed to NPR’s flagship news magazines, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. His writing  reviews and reportage  has been published by The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Columbia Journalism Review, and the Virginia Quarterly Review.

Gura’s work has been recognized by the National Press Foundation, the National Constitution Center, and the French-American Foundation. In 2012, he was awarded a Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellowship, and he has been invited to participate in seminars at Stanford University and Dartmouth College, among other universities.

An alumnus of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, Gura received his bachelor’s degree in history and American studies from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., where he also played the fiddle in an old-time string band called The Dead Sea Squirrels. He spent a semester in La Paz, Bolivia, at 12,000 feet above sea level, studying political science at the Universidad Mayor de San Andrés and the Universidad Católica Boliviana.

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Features by David Gura

Cuts you can count on

Whatever the ultimate debt ceiling deal, some things are certain

If debt deadline is missed, who will get paid?

At some point, the U.S. government will have to decide who gets paid and who doesn't, if Congress and the president don't agree on a new debt ceiling. Some government obligations will have priority over others

Cutting spending will hurt jobs

Neither debt ceiling plan under debate in Congress addresses the nation's high unemployment -- they only cut government spending. Economists say the question isn't whether that will hurt employment, it's by how much?
Posted In: Jobs

In the debt ceiling debate, Obama warns of worst case scenario

After months of debate, only two debt plans are currently on the table: a Democratic plan that avoids cutting Medicare and Social Security, and the Republican plan to raise the debt ceiling in stages.

AT&T presses its case for merger

The giant phone company delivers more data to the Federal Communications Commission to support its argument that a merger with T-Mobile will improve service and even cut costs for consumers.
Posted In: Mergers and Acquisitions

How the Dodd-Frank rules are made

One year after President Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Act, more than 300 new rules for the financial sector are on the way. How banks and other interests go about shaping them is fairly straightforward, at least to start: Write a letter. Get in line to talk to the rule-makers.
Posted In: Banks

Balanced-budget amendment would do what?

A Republican proposal for an amendment requiring the U.S. government to balance its budget won't pass Congress. But it's worth looking at why the government doesn't have that requirement.

Clorox, meet your activist investor

Billionaire investor Carl Icahn has offered to buy Clorox for $10 billion, which would give him a major say in the company's fiscal operations.
Posted In: Retail

Debt talks: Are we ready for Plan C?

President Obama told lawmakers that "it's decision time" for the ongoing debt talks. But is there an actual deal within reach?

UC expected to raise tuition

University of California regents are set to vote today on a plan to increase tuition by more an $1,000 per student for the coming year.
Posted In: Education

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