Based in Washington, David Gura is a senior reporter for Marketplace, the public radio business and economics program, and since 2013, he also has been the show’s primary substitute host.

During his tenure at Marketplace, Gura has filed dispatches from the White House, the Capitol, and the Supreme Court. He has covered the implementation of healthcare and financial reform, and he has been a trusted guide to listeners through countless political crises, including budget battles, showdowns and shutdowns.

Gura has also traveled widely. After the financial crisis, he reported on the economic recovery, and ahead of the 2012 and 2014 elections, he spent a lot of time talking to Americans in places that were both electorally and economically unique. In 2013, after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, in Newtown, Conn., he spent several months as the lead reporter on a series called “Guns and Dollars,” about the U.S. firearms industry.

Previously, Gura worked at NPR, first as an editor and a producer, then as a reporter for The Two-Way, its breaking news blog. In addition, he regularly contributed to NPR’s flagship news magazines, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. His writing  reviews and reportage  has been published by The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Columbia Journalism Review, and the Virginia Quarterly Review.

Gura’s work has been recognized by the National Press Foundation, the National Constitution Center, and the French-American Foundation. In 2012, he was awarded a Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellowship, and he has been invited to participate in seminars at Stanford University and Dartmouth College, among other universities.

An alumnus of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, Gura received his bachelor’s degree in history and American studies from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., where he also played the fiddle in an old-time string band called The Dead Sea Squirrels. He spent a semester in La Paz, Bolivia, at 12,000 feet above sea level, studying political science at the Universidad Mayor de San Andrés and the Universidad Católica Boliviana.

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Features by David Gura

Lenovo hopes to corner business market for tablets

While many tablets continue to fail when faced up against Apple, companies are still churning out new models. China-based Lenovo launches its ThinkPad today, hoping to appeal to business users.

Lenovo debuts computer tablet

ThinkPad will launch today to challenge Apple's iPad.

Is Capital One suddenly too big?

The former credit card company has bought several banks and now is buying ING Direct, a large and popular online bank. It will become the nation's fifth-largest depository bank
Posted In: Banks

How to lose money by saving more

The Federal Reserve's plan to keep interest rates near zero for two more years nearly wipes out interest income for people who rely on federally insured savings accounts and certificates of deposit.
Posted In: Savings

Leveraging jobs in rural areas

The Obama administration's proposals for creating jobs in rural areas counts on a few good jobs generating many more
Posted In: Jobs

Obama to talk jobs on town hall tour

The president looks prepared to talk about small business and creating jobs, but Americans may also grill him about the political divide in Washington
Posted In: Jobs

Low interest rates bad for savers

The Great Recession shocked many Americans into saving more money, but unfortunately, they aren't getting much of a return on those savings.
Posted In: Retirement

Fed to hold rates steady for two years

The Federal Reserve said the economy is still suffering, and took the unprecedented step of saying it will hold rates at nearly zero until the middle of 2013
Posted In: The Federal Reserve

Everybody loses as the FAA remains unfunded

Congress has gone on vacation without funding the FAA. Now inspectors have to work without pay, and the nation goes $1.2 billion short
Posted In: Airlines

Debt deal won't cut entitlements

If members of Congress agree to this new debt deal, entitlement programs won't be cut -- at least initially. But big cuts could come in the second round

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