Dan is a sustainability reporter for Marketplace.  He has produced multimedia and radio features for WBEZ, NPR, BBC World Service and other public-media outlets. 

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Features by Dan Weissmann

There are many factors involved in the fluctuation of oil prices.

Why oil prices move up and down so much

Predicting global supply and demand is enormously complicated
Posted In: oil prices, traders, data, oil markets
The window sticker of a Chevrolet Aveo with a miles-per-gallon rating of 26 city/34 highway is seen at Hoskins Chevrolet in Elk Grove Village, Illinois.

How the EPA made gas-mileage numbers accurate

The EPA has increasingly made mileage tests a more accurate measure of reality
Posted In: mpg, cars, automobile, EPA, gas mileage, fuel economy, Hyundai, Kia

In Chicago mayoral race, money talks

With a huge fundraising lead, Rahm Emanuel rises in the polls.
Posted In: Chicago, Rahm Emanuel, election spending

How Photoshop changed the way we see everything

25 years into the Photoshop era, we know that what we see... could be a fake.
Posted In: photoshop, advertising
Only a minority of movie tickets are sold online. Popcorn photo by HeatherLions via Wikimedia

Why nobody buys movie tickets online

It costs extra. And mostly, you don't need an advance ticket to get in.
Posted In: movie, mobile, online sales
Flooding in the low-lying Miami area, like that shown here from 2007, will get worse as sea-levels rise, putting much of the areas property values at risk.

The market doesn't charge for Florida's climate risk

Not yet, anyway. It's not built to recognize risks more than a few years away.
Posted In: Miami, Florida, water, climate change, rising seas, property values, bond market
During a 2012 strike, container ships remain anchored at the entrance to the Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors.

Port lockouts and the sea's importance in supply chain

What happens when your ship comes in, and there’s no one to unload your goods.
Posted In: sea ports, strike, imports, exports, cargo
Geologist Harold Wanless stands in front of a salinity-control barrier near the Miami airport. Many such structures, which release floodwater without letting in saltwater, will cease to function in a few decades.

Rising seas threaten South Florida's drinking water

Even with 60 inches of rain a year, Miami may not have enough to drink.
Posted In: rising sea level, Miami, real estate
High-rise construction cranes hover over downtown Miami.

Miami condo-buyers aren't homeowners. They're traders.

Why fears of rising seas and big storms don't cool the market.
Posted In: real estate, Miami, investment

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