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Chris Farrell is economics editor of Marketplace Money, a nationally syndicated one-hour weekly personal finance show produced by American Public Media. Chris is also economics correspondent for Marketplace, the largest business program in broadcasting and chief economics correspondent for American RadioWorks, the largest producer of long-form documentaries in public radio. He is also contributing economics editor at Business Week magazine. He was host and executive editor of public television’s Right on the Money. He is the author of two books: Right on the Money: Taking Control of Your Personal Finances, and Deflation: What Happens When Prices Fall. Chris is a graduate of Stanford and the London School of Economics.

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Features by Chris Farrell

A bleak household financial picture

The financial toll on families from the dreadful economy of recent years is enormous.
Posted In: debt, Savings, net worth, family finances, student loans

Why companies are still hoarding their cash

Like the rest of us, companies are still uncertain of the economic future. But spending and investing could help to push the economy forward.
Posted In: fiscal cliff, Federal Reserve

The Federal Reserve and interest rates

There is an implication by those in the media that the Fed is essentially out of tools when it comes to lowering interest rates. Can the Federal Reserve lower the Fed Funds rate below zero? If so, what would be the implications for borrowers, savers and the macroeconomy? Richard, Marietta, GA
Posted In: interest rates, Federal Reserve

Choosing a credit card

I am a graduate student in my mid-20s who has never had a credit card. While I have been able to get by without one, I have finally reached a stage in my personal and professional life where not having one has become a real inconvenience (when trying to reserve a rental car, for example). I would be grateful for advice on the cards, or kinds of cards, that I should seek or avoid for a first credit card -- as well as whether I'm likely to receive one, and (if not) what I can do to make myself a better candidate. Stephanie, Minneapolis, MN
Posted In: Credit Cards, credit card interest rates, credit report, Credit report, credit score

Why cash may be king -- for now

I have $30,000 and want to know where best to put it. Ultimately, I want to put it away for my three boys' futures. I want it to make something, however slowly, without risk. But, 0.4 percent? Is that really the best I can do? Joanna, Hammond, IN
Posted In: mortgage, mortgage refinance, Savings, safe savings, Personal Finance

Planning for the end of life

I am a 52-year-old single woman with no children. I have three older siblings and several nieces and nephews, although we are not particularly close (not estranged, just not close). This summer, my goal is to put in place basic end-of-life preparations like a will and a burial plan -- possibly long-term-care insurance as well. I learned from my parents' aging and deaths how much help the elderly can need, and how much stress and anxiety that can cause for those who love them. Can you give me some direction before I head to a lawyer? Julia, Omaha, NE
Posted In: Estate planning, durable power of attorney, advanced health care directive, will, beneficiaries

Europe and a credit card

Hi! I'm living in Europe for a year or so, but all my bank accounts are still in the U.S. I've been using my credit card for everything and paying off the balance monthly. Is this bad credit card behavior? Could I be hurting my credit score? Thanks! Alexa, Baltimore, MD
Posted In: Credit card, credit score, living abroad

Budgeting 101

Can you recommend a book on how to put yourself on a budget? Thank you, Elizabeth, Unionville, PA
Posted In: budget, Saving, spending, personal finance books

Breaking a buck

Money market mutual funds are just as vulnerable to the temperaments of Wall Street.
Posted In: Commentaries, Chris Farrell, money market mutual funds

Time to attack credit card debts

I received a large bonus, and I'm going to use it all to pay down credit card debt. I have many cards. They all have about the same outstanding balances and about the same interest rates. At one time, most of the cards were "maxed out," which was bad for my credit score. Should I pay off a couple cards entirely, or should I make larger-than-usual payments to all of them, bringing down the outstanding balances substantially below the credit limits? Thanks. Henry, Chicago, IL
Posted In: Credit Cards, credit score, debt, credit limit

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