Chris Farrell is economics editor of Marketplace Money, a nationally syndicated one-hour weekly personal finance show produced by American Public Media. Chris is also economics correspondent for Marketplace, the largest business program in broadcasting and chief economics correspondent for American RadioWorks, the largest producer of long-form documentaries in public radio. He is also contributing economics editor at Business Week magazine. He was host and executive editor of public television’s Right on the Money. He is the author of two books: Right on the Money: Taking Control of Your Personal Finances, and Deflation: What Happens When Prices Fall. Chris is a graduate of Stanford and the London School of Economics.

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Features by Chris Farrell

Savings bonds and emergency funds

The place where I keep my emergency fund is in U.S. Treasury I-Series savings bonds. Is there any reason why I wouldn't want to keep the emergency fund there? Is there a dynamic that I am not considering? Dave, Denver, CO
Posted In: savings bonds, I-bonds, emergency savings

Personal finance suggestions for grandson

What do you recommend I get for my grandson who is in his third year of college and has no idea of how to manage his meager funds? William, Amherst, MA
Posted In: college finances, budget, personal finance basics, personal finance books

This economic recovery will be a jobless one

Marketplace's Chris Farrell argues that this recovery is more similar to the jobless recoveries of the 1990s and 2000s than of the 1980s and 1970s, and he talks about what to expect going forward.
Posted In: Unemployment, jobless, recovery

You can't share an IRA

Can my wife and I share one Roth IRA and contribute as much as $10,000 a year to it, or must we each have separate IRAs with the normal $5,000-a-year contribution cap? Jake, Madison, WI
Posted In: IRA, Roth-IRA, retirement savings

Charitable giving hangs on

Charitable giving adds up to 2 percent of real gross domestic product, down from a recent peak of 2.3 percent in 2001.
Posted In: Charitable giving

What are high fees costing you?

A theme of these blog posts is that fees matter when it comes to investment returns.
Posted In: fees, investment fees, retirement savings plan, Calculators

Tracking a dollar around the world

Would you investigate the trajectory of a single dollar bill? Let me explain. So you go to the store and buy things, then you pay with a $100 bill. What happens to that note? In a nutshell, my question is: What is the route that a single bill takes? How does it circulate? How far can it travel? Homero, Sacramento, CA
Posted In: Money, globalization, Books, invest, bank

The snowball way toward eliminating debt

I have been paying down my debt using the snowball method. I'm making great headway and have cut my debt load in half in 3 years. I'm at a point where I need to choose between a home-equity loan with a variable rate (currently at 4.24 percent but eligible for tax deductions) and a car loan at 3.5 percent fixed. Which makes more sense to pay down? Scott, Chatham, MI
Posted In: interest rates, home equity loan, car loan, debt repayment

Global turmoil and retirement planning

What should investors -- especially those in their 50s and 60s -- do with their already diminished retirement savings?
Posted In: retirement savings, Investing, Savings, inflation, Economy

The co-borrower blues

I purchased a condo with a good friend approximately 5 years ago. We co-signed the mortgage and have had a great experience co-owning as friends. I recently got engaged and it's time for me (us) to move on. I'm having a difficult time finding an alternative to having my name removed from the co-signed mortgage. What options exist for us? Tom, Minneapolis, MN
Posted In: cosigner, c0-borrower, mortgage, home

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