New tech doorbells have cameras, and that’s an ethics problem
Jan 17, 2019

New tech doorbells have cameras, and that’s an ethics problem

HTML EMBED:
COPY

Internet-connected doorbells with cameras built in are becoming very popular. Amazon-owned Ring is the best-known product. Google also has the Nest Hello. But the phenomenon of doorbell video has privacy experts worried. There's the potential for misuse and abuse of these home surveillance devices by people who are shaming each other or labeling people as suspicious. And the companies that make them may have access to video at a level customers don't understand. Molly Wood talks with Laura Norén, director of research at Obsidian Security. She says part of the problem is that owners of video doorbells are filming a lot more territory than the terms of service say they should.

Today's show is sponsored by the University of Florida Warrington College of Business and Indeed.

Segments From this episode

New tech doorbells can record video, and that's an ethics problem

Jan 17, 2019
They might be recording a lot more than who's at the front door.
Part of the problem with doorbell cameras is that their owners are filming a lot more territory than the terms of service say they should, says Laura Norén, director of research at Obsidian Security.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Internet-connected doorbells with cameras built in are becoming very popular. Amazon-owned Ring is the best-known product. Google also has the Nest Hello. But the phenomenon of doorbell video has privacy experts worried. There’s the potential for misuse and abuse of these home surveillance devices by people who are shaming each other or labeling people as suspicious. And the companies that make them may have access to video at a level customers don’t understand. Molly Wood talks with Laura Norén, director of research at Obsidian Security. She says part of the problem is that owners of video doorbells are filming a lot more territory than the terms of service say they should.

Today’s show is sponsored by the University of Florida Warrington College of Business and Indeed.

The future of this podcast starts with you.

Every day, Molly Wood and the “Tech” team demystify the digital economy with stories that explore more than just “Big Tech.” We’re committed to covering topics that matter to you and the world around us, diving deep into how technology intersects with climate change, inequity, and disinformation.

As part of a nonprofit newsroom, we’re counting on listeners like you to keep this public service paywall-free and available to all.

Support “Marketplace Tech” in any amount today and become a partner in our mission.

The team