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Colleges look at delaying the first day of school … again

Erika Beras Jan 6, 2021
Heard on: Marketplace
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Students and their families move belongings at a campus dormitory at the University of South Carolina on Aug. 10, 2020, in Columbia, South Carolina. Sean Rayford/Getty Images
COVID-19

Colleges look at delaying the first day of school … again

Erika Beras Jan 6, 2021
Students and their families move belongings at a campus dormitory at the University of South Carolina on Aug. 10, 2020, in Columbia, South Carolina. Sean Rayford/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
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The new year also means the start of a new semester for colleges and universities. But some institutions are once again delaying the start of classes, or moving what would have been in-person classes online. 

Those decisions are being driven by the pandemic, and the surge of infection rates around the country. But this second round of delayed starts and online classes will have both immediate and far-reaching financial implications for institutions. 

Marybeth Gasman’s daughter is a student at Bryn Mawr College. She was supposed to go back to school in mid-January and now she’s looking at mid-February. 

“They’re definitely coming back on campus and staying in residence halls,” she said. “But the last email we got was, you know, this could change at any point.”

Gasman isn’t only a college parent. She teaches at Rutgers and studies minority-serving institutions of higher education. Schools are weighing health risks and their finances to make decisions, she said.

“If you don’t have a safety net and you don’t have a strong endowment and you are very, very tuition reliant, your situation is much, much more dire,” Gasman said. 

Dire because of reduced enrollment and unexpected costs — millions of dollars spent on personal protective equipment and COVID-19 testing. 

Chris Marsicano is with the College Crisis Initiative at Davidson College. He said these decisions are harder for state schools and smaller ones.

“A lot of institutions are heavily dependent on tuition and room and board in order to keep their doors open,” he said.

School budgets are in worse shape now than they were last fall, said Robert Kelchen, a professor of higher education at Seton Hall. 

“But on the bright side, there’s a clearer ending point to the pandemic than there was in the fall,” he said.

That’s due to the vaccine. And, Kelchen said, schools have taken other steps: laying off staff, canceling majors, delaying entry to PhD programs and pay cuts. 

Kelchen said his pay was cut by 7% in the Spring. It’s unclear when it’ll be restored. 

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What are the details of President Joe Biden’s coronavirus relief plan?

The $1.9 trillion plan would aim to speed up the vaccine rollout and provide financial help to individuals, states and local governments and businesses. Called the “American Rescue Plan,” the legislative proposal would meet Biden’s goal of administering 100 million vaccines by the 100th day of his administration, while advancing his objective of reopening most schools by the spring. It would also include $1,400 checks for most Americans. Get the rest of the specifics here.

What kind of help can small businesses get right now?

A new round of Paycheck Protection Program loans recently became available for pandemic-ravaged businesses. These loans don’t have to be paid back if rules are met. Right now, loans are open for first-time applicants. And the application has to go through community banking organizations — no big banks, for now, at least. This rollout is designed to help business owners who couldn’t get a PPP loan before.

What does the hiring situation in the U.S. look like as we enter the new year?

New data on job openings and postings provide a glimpse of what to expect in the job market in the coming weeks and months. This time of year typically sees a spike in hiring and job-search activity, says Jill Chapman with Insperity, a recruiting services firm. But that kind of optimistic planning for the future isn’t really the vibe these days. Job postings have been lagging on the job search site Indeed. Listings were down about 11% in December compared to a year earlier.

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