Life on the bottom rung of the rental market during a housing crisis

Aaron Mendelson May 21, 2020
Heard on: Marketplace Morning Report
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A courtyard at the River Glen Apartments in San Bernardino, California. Chava Sanchez/LAist

Life on the bottom rung of the rental market during a housing crisis

Aaron Mendelson May 21, 2020
A courtyard at the River Glen Apartments in San Bernardino, California. Chava Sanchez/LAist
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Amid California’s housing crisis — underscored by a shortage of 3 million units of affordable housing in the state — some low-income tenants say they feel stuck in housing that can be dirty, dangerous and even deadly. Some were living in unsafe and unsanitary conditions even before the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, people are spending even more time in those homes.

PAMA Management rents housing to tens of thousands of Californians. PAMA’s clientele is made up largely of low-income tenants who represent the bottom rung of the rental market. The company said in a statement it “cares about the communities and people we serve. Providing affordable housing to those who need it is our mission.”

But a review of government documents about PAMA shows the landlord has a long record of violations, and some tenants said they see persistent problems.


This story was originally published as part of a longer reporting project by KPCC/LAist, “Deceit, Disrepair and Death Inside a Southern California Rental Empire.”

You can read the full story here.

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