Using your brain to control an exoskeleton

Molly Wood Jan 29, 2014
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Using your brain to control an exoskeleton

Molly Wood Jan 29, 2014
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This month, a neuroscientist and his team announced that the ceremonial first kick at this year’s World Cup opening in Brazil would be completed by a paralyzed teenager using an exoskeleton attached to her brain. Prosthetic robotic devices connected to the human brain are becoming more common. You may remember video a few years ago of a woman at the University of Pittsburgh feeding herself chocolate with a robot limb. For today’s installment of Marketplace Tech’s sports and tech series, “Gaming the System,” we’ll hear from a guy working in this field.

Dr. Michael Boninger, from the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, tells Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson about bioengineering and using brain signals to control exoskeletons and prosthetics.

 

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