Marketplace Scratch Pad

Morning Reading

Scott Jagow Nov 12, 2009

Good morning. Here’s what has caught my attention so far:

Other countries try to save the dollar (Wall Street Journal)

Governments around the world stepped up efforts to stem the U.S. dollar’s slide, as officials grow increasingly concerned about the impact of the weak greenback on their nascent economic recoveries.

Thailand, South Korea, Russia and the Philippines have been snapping up dollars this week in order to hold down the value of their currencies, traders said Wednesday, as the U.S. currency wallowed near 15-month lows.

There are still too many houses (Fortune)

About one in seven housing units was vacant in the third quarter, according to the Census Department. This year has registered the highest reading since the government began collecting such data in 1965.

Part of the glut comes from a rash of foreclosures as strapped borrowers fall behind on their mortgages.

But rental apartments are emptying out at a record clip as well, as a spike in the jobless rate and a decade of subpar wage growth have sent many Americans back home to live with Mom and Dad.

Job woes are exacting a toll on family life (New York Times)

For many families across the country, the greatest damage inflicted by this recession has not necessarily been financial, but emotional and psychological. Children, especially, have become hidden casualties, often absorbing more than their parents are fully aware of. Several academic studies have linked parental job loss — especially that of fathers — to adverse impacts in areas like school performance and self-esteem.

“I’ve heard a lot of people who are out of work say it’s kind of been a blessing, that you have more time to spend with your family,” Mr. Bachmuth said. “I love my family and my family comes first, and my family means more than anything to me, but it hasn’t been that way for me.”

Fed’s regulatory powers challenged under Senate plan (PBS NewsHour)

Goldman Sach’s not very charitable foundation (Felix Salmon)

Treasury charges $522,866 for a single FOIA request (Wired)

“200 one dollar bills” sells for $44 billion (Bloomberg)

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