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Washington’s new green party

Jill Barshay Jun 18, 2007
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Washington’s new green party

Jill Barshay Jun 18, 2007
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TEXT OF STORY

Bob Moon: The Senate hopes to wrap up a new energy bill this week if Democrats and Republicans can come to terms on such issues as how high to raise fuel economy standards. And while they haggle over the nation’s environmental policies, party operatives on both sides are moving ahead with their own green initiatives. Marketplace’s Jill Barshay reports.


Jill Barshay: Democrats and Republicans say they’re going to hold their greenest national party conventions in 2008.

They’ll throw confetti made from recycled paper and use hybrid vehicles to shuttle thousands around town.

Denver’s the site for the Democratic convention. Mayor John Hickenlooper says city officials explained the idea to Howard Dean and his staff.

Mayor John Hickenlooper: All the housing, all the hotel registration online, so no paper.

Both parties are clearly interested in painting themselves green to appeal to the growing number of voters who care about the environment.

But Julia Bovey of the Natural Resources Defense Council applauds the green spin.

Julia Bovey: Both of these conventions are enormous consumers of products, whether we’re talking about paper products or food. They’ll be sending a message to the marketplace, if you want us to buy your stuff, you better make it environmentally sustainable.

It’s possible Republicans and Democrats will prove better at throwing energy-efficient parties than passing energy-efficient legislation.

I’m Jill Barshay for Marketplace.

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