Mexican protests proving pricey

Marketplace Staff Aug 4, 2006
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Mexican protests proving pricey

Marketplace Staff Aug 4, 2006
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MARK AUSTIN THOMAS: Not moving. That’s what a lot of protestors are doing in Mexico City. That lack of movement is slowing down the city’s economy. Thousands of angry, screaming demonstrators are challenging the Presidential election results from last month. Those results have named right-of-center Felipe Calderon the country’s next leader. Reporter Franc Contreras says the protests are having a serious impact on some businesses.


FRANC CONTRERAS: The blockade of Paseo de la Reforma has stopped all vehicle traffic to the main thoroughfare through Mexico City’s financial district. No cars mean fewer customers for the boulevard’s high-end shops, hotels and restaurants.

Some businesses have even taken to passing out flyers in front of the Mexican Stock Exchange to remind traders they are open.

Vivian Murman is with the trendy La Camelia restaurant.

VIVIAN MURMAN: “We’re trying to tell the people that we’re still open. That they can come to visit us. That they are not in danger and we have to take this strategy.”

Cab drivers like Rafael Garcia have also lost their patience with the protesters.

RAFAEL GARCIA:“It’s harming me. It’s harming many citizens who go to their jobs. They’re losing time and money.”

Economists say the blockade is costing businesses along the boulevard as much as $9 million a day.

In Mexico City, I’m Franc Contreras for Marketplace.

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