Marketplace AM for August 16, 2006

Episode Description 

Hewlett Packard earnings

The marker of personal computers and printers is expected to meet Wall Street expectations when it reports quarterly earnings today. Charla Bear reports.
Posted In: Wall Street

Chinese students regret going to college

Young people in China are a little cynical about college. A new survey says that a third of graduates say their education was a waste of time and money. Jocelyn Ford reports.
Posted In: Canada

Non-stop from DC to Beijing?

United wants to be the first US airline to fly non-stop from Washington DC to Beijing. The airline's filing a request with the government today, but there's some competition. Ashley Milne-Tyte reports.

America losing its competitive edge

Commentator Robert Reich argues American businesses need to lobby Congress to bolster science and math education for the sake of American competitiveness.

Chinese invest in art

There's a lot of money sloshing around in China's middle class these days and it's found a new home in art auctions houses. Jocelyn Ford looks at what's driving the craze.
Posted In: Canada

Who owns 'pod'?

Apple is out to reserve the use of the word pod for its own products. Ashley Milne-Tyte has the story.

New inflation numbers

In an effort to make the government's Consumer Price Index more accurate, the Bureau of Labor Statistics may begin calculating the figure out to three decimal places. Hillary Wicai explains why.
Posted In: Wall Street

American shareholders sue BP

BP's American shareholders are suing the British oil giant over the partial shutdown of its Prudhoe Bay oil field in Alaska. The lawsuit accuses BP executives of negligence. Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Canada

Showdown at Heinz

It's high noon at ketchup maker H.J. Heinz today, where a dissident shareholder squares off against the CEO over the future direction of the company. Lisa Napoli reports.

Double-whammy for hurricane victims

A federal judge yesterday ruled an insurance company could not be compelled to pay for storm-surge flood damage resulting from Hurricane Katrina. Stacey Vanek-Smith looks at what the decision might mean for hundreds of similar cases.