Sabri Ben-Achour is a reporter for Marketplace, based in the New York City bureau.   He covers Wall Street, finance, and anything New York and money related.  

Economics and finance are really hard.  But they don’t have to be boring.  In fact, they mustn’t be: because they are as important to a functioning society as history and art and politics.  Fundamentally, Sabri believes the duty of an economics reporter is to bridge that gap – to absorb, break down, and make comprehensible and palatable (as in “fun”) the economic news of the day and the decade.  This - as it should be for all journalism -  is in the service of citizens who must decide how to conceptualize the society in which they live, their place in it, and how to guide its future.  

Prior to joining Marketplace in 2013,  Sabri was the Environment Reporter for WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC where his work received two regional Edward R. Murrow awards for use of sound and feature reporting, five Chesapeake AP Broadcasters Association awards, and shared in a Gracie Award for the Kojo Nnamdi Show.

As a freelancer, Sabri has reported from earthquake-ravaged Haiti, the revolution-riven streets of Tunisia, the jungle streams of Panama, and the Democratic Republic of Congo’s war torn Eastern provinces. 

Sabri attended the University of Virginia where he received his bachelor’s degree in Foreign Affairs with a focus on the Middle East.  He attended the Georgetown Walsh School of Foreign Service where he received his master’s in Foreign Service, focusing on global commerce and finance.

In his spare time, Sabri teaches and makes ceramics.  

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Features by Sabri Ben-Achour

Microsoft stock is up, but Windows is 'Blue'

Is Windows Blue an admission of failure or just an evolution for the new Windows 8 operating system?
Posted In: windows 8, Microsoft, tablets, mobile

You may soon have to pay for YouTube

YouTube will reportedly start charging around $1.99 a month for certain channels -- not for the cats on skateboards, but high quality produced content.
Posted In: YouTube, online video, digital subscription

Why the Fed wants you to quit your job

The rate at which Americans are quitting their jobs is rising. That can be a good sign for the economic and labor market outlook.
Posted In: Jobs, Unemployment

Old media battles online companies for digital ad spending

There are some unexpected newcomers to the digital video world as advertising grows. Magazine publisher Condé Nast is one of the new big names rolling out a suite of original video content.
Posted In: upfronts, television, streaming

As One World Trade Center rises, will its offices also fill up?

One World Trade in New York City will be the western hemisphere’s tallest building. But it has leased only half its space, and there are three more buildings to come.
Posted In: WTC1, world trade center, New York City

The business strategy in plausible deniability

Every workplace tragedy in the developing world elicits promises from U.S. companies to improve oversight of labor conditions. But these companies also create plausible deniability of workplace ills by having layers of subcontractors.
Posted In: Bangladesh

Tweeting your firing: The rise of announcing your professional demise

Terminated employees used to go quietly. But Twitter is becoming a popular site for announcing one's own professional demise. Is that a good thing?
Posted In: Twitter, social media, workplace, etiquette

Is reality TV running out of steam?

Today Dutch group Mars One is set to announce details about its plan to fund a human colony on Mars -- by turning the process into a reality TV show. Is the once fast-growing, profitable reality TV machine -- here on Earth -- sputtering?
Posted In: reality tv, television, media

Like Shamu, SeaWorld leaps after IPO: Why theme parks are doing well

SeaWorld Entertainment, home of famous orca Shamu, wowed investors in a big IPO. Amid concern about consumer spending in a slow, fragile economic recovery, theme parks are doing surprisingly well. Why?
Posted In: sea world, IPO, theme parks

As PC sales fall, supercomputers soar

Supercomputing are in hot demand. But not just from governments and large companies. Smaller businesses facing complex challenges are seeking some of the faster computers in the world.
Posted In: supercomputer

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