Voting machines are totally hackable. But who’s going to pay to fix them?
Oct 23, 2018

Voting machines are totally hackable. But who’s going to pay to fix them?

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The midterm elections are here. Early voting is already happening in some places. We’re spending the rest of the week on election security and technology, starting with voting machines. Candice Hoke, founding co-director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, believes insecure voting machines are the biggest security threat to the midterm elections. Hoke says that voting infrastructure should be regulated and funded like a public utility. (10/23/18)

Segments From this episode

Voting machines are totally hackable. But who's going to pay to fix them?

Oct 23, 2018
An argument for why voting systems should be regulated — and funded — like public utilities.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Voting machines are totally hackable. But who's going to pay to fix them?

Oct 23, 2018
An argument for why voting systems should be regulated — and funded — like public utilities.
Voters cast their ballots at voting machines in Las Vegas in 2016.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The midterm elections are here. Early voting is already happening in some places. We’re spending the rest of the week on election security and technology, starting with voting machines. Candice Hoke, founding co-director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, believes insecure voting machines are the biggest security threat to the midterm elections. Hoke says that voting infrastructure should be regulated and funded like a public utility. (10/23/18)

The future of this podcast starts with you.

Every day, Molly Wood and the “Tech” team demystify the digital economy with stories that explore more than just “Big Tech.” We’re committed to covering topics that matter to you and the world around us, diving deep into how technology intersects with climate change, inequity, and disinformation.

As part of a nonprofit newsroom, we’re counting on listeners like you to keep this public service paywall-free and available to all.

Support “Marketplace Tech” in any amount today and become a partner in our mission.

Voting machines are totally hackable. But who’s going to pay to fix them?
Oct 23, 2018

Voting machines are totally hackable. But who’s going to pay to fix them?

HTML EMBED:
COPY

The midterm elections are here. Early voting is already happening in some places. We’re spending the rest of the week on election security and technology, starting with voting machines. Candice Hoke, founding co-director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, believes insecure voting machines are the biggest security threat to the midterm elections. Hoke says that voting infrastructure should be regulated and funded like a public utility. (10/23/18)

Segments From this episode

Voting machines are totally hackable. But who's going to pay to fix them?

Oct 23, 2018
An argument for why voting systems should be regulated — and funded — like public utilities.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Voting machines are totally hackable. But who's going to pay to fix them?

Oct 23, 2018
An argument for why voting systems should be regulated — and funded — like public utilities.
Voters cast their ballots at voting machines in Las Vegas in 2016.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The midterm elections are here. Early voting is already happening in some places. We’re spending the rest of the week on election security and technology, starting with voting machines. Candice Hoke, founding co-director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Privacy Protection at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, believes insecure voting machines are the biggest security threat to the midterm elections. Hoke says that voting infrastructure should be regulated and funded like a public utility. (10/23/18)

The future of this podcast starts with you.

Every day, Molly Wood and the “Tech” team demystify the digital economy with stories that explore more than just “Big Tech.” We’re committed to covering topics that matter to you and the world around us, diving deep into how technology intersects with climate change, inequity, and disinformation.

As part of a nonprofit newsroom, we’re counting on listeners like you to keep this public service paywall-free and available to all.

Support “Marketplace Tech” in any amount today and become a partner in our mission.