What counts as breaking campaign finance law?
Aug 23, 2018

What counts as breaking campaign finance law?

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(Markets Edition) Michael Cohen, the president's former lawyer, has admitted to arranging for the parent company of the National Enquirer to pay $150,000 to former Playboy model Karen McDougal. This was to essentially buy her silence over her account that she had had an affair with President Donald Trump which Trump denies. The idea was American Media Inc. would buy the rights to the story and then just sit on it. But prosecutors say this coordinated effort wasn't just about stopping stories from getting out. Paying hush money and sitting on stories isn't necessarily illegal. Columbia Law School professor Richard Briffault says the legal problem is that because these coordinated efforts helped the Trump campaign, they become a contribution to the campaign. We talk to him on the show. Also, jobless claims are out today, 210,00 people filed for unemployment benefits. That number is low, but one analyst says maybe too low. Then, a story from California where a bill is under consideration that would legalize the sale of meals made in homes.  

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed (Indeed.com/marketplace) and by Abby Connect (abbyconnect.com).  

(08/23/2018)

 

(Markets Edition) Michael Cohen, the president’s former lawyer, has admitted to arranging for the parent company of the National Enquirer to pay $150,000 to former Playboy model Karen McDougal. This was to essentially buy her silence over her account that she had had an affair with President Donald Trump which Trump denies. The idea was American Media Inc. would buy the rights to the story and then just sit on it. But prosecutors say this coordinated effort wasn’t just about stopping stories from getting out. Paying hush money and sitting on stories isn’t necessarily illegal. Columbia Law School professor Richard Briffault says the legal problem is that because these coordinated efforts helped the Trump campaign, they become a contribution to the campaign. We talk to him on the show. Also, jobless claims are out today, 210,00 people filed for unemployment benefits. That number is low, but one analyst says maybe too low. Then, a story from California where a bill is under consideration that would legalize the sale of meals made in homes.  

Today’s show is sponsored by Indeed (Indeed.com/marketplace) and by Abby Connect (abbyconnect.com).  

(08/23/2018)

 

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC