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A few picks for your summer reading list

Raghu Manavalan Jul 11, 2013
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If you want to brush up on your personal finances while lounging on the beach, here’s a few must-read books from personal finance experts around the country. 

  • Michelle Singletary, personal finance columnist for the Washington Post, suggests reading “The Millionaire Next Door” by Thomas Stanley and William Danko.

“What I love about this book is it talks about the typical millionaire. And it’s not who you think it is, it’s not J-Lo, although she’s a millionaire. But it’s average people who’ve been able to save and work hard and become millionaires,” Singletary says. “And this is the secret, are you ready? They don’t overspend! They live below their means, they clip coupons [and] they wear inexpensive clothes.

“[Warren Buffett] has this ability to look out and ignore technology and ignore all these hot spots, and focus on what’s really important and so crucial to what makes a company tick [and] what makes a company valuable to an investor.” Glink says. “While it’s not going to help me manage my money better, it might help me think about finances in a different way.”

  • Paula Wethington, personal finance columnist for the Monroe News recommended “Financial Recovery” by Karen McCall.

“You’re not going to be overwhelmed with charts and credit card numbers and spreadsheets,” Wethington says. “She’s going to ask, ‘what do you really want to spend your money on?’ and then you go from there.”

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