Marketplace PM for September 2, 2005

Episode Description 

On the ground in New Orleans

Days after Hurricane Katrina struck, the National Guard arrived in force in New Orleans. Today thousands of evacuees in the Superdome are looking forward to their first decent meal since the storm. Reporter Mira Oberman talks to Cheryl Glaser.

Houston makes room for refugees

Busload after busload of tired, hungry and sick hurricane refugees continues to pour into Houston today. Their stay in the city is supposed to be temporary, but Bob Moon reports that it could be long-term.

Trying to stay healthy

With Katrina has come a growing health crisis. There are storm-related illnesses, and people who've run out medications they need. Alisa Roth reports.

Jobs and unemployment

US employers created a solid 169,000 new jobs last month. And unemployment fell to 4.9 percent — its lowest level in four years. Hillary Wicai looks at whether these numbers point to which way the wind blows.

Albertson's goes on the block

Albertson's grocery chain may soon have a new product for sale — itself. As Marketplace's Amy Scott reports, shares of Albertson's and its competitors went flying off the shelves.

The week on Wall Street

Cheryl Glaser talks to analyst David Johnson about what he calls the longest five days in a very long time.

Chaos, confusion and desperation at home

The situation in New Orleans has many people asking: how could this be happening in the richest and most powerful country on the planet? Stephen Henn tried to get some answers.

Oil, oh so Continental

The European Union has pledged to dip into its oil reserves and pump an extra 30 million barrels on to world markets.When it comes to oil, there's more at work here than just altruism. From the Marketplace European Desk, Stephen Beard reports.

Stay home for Labor Day. Or maybe not.

Don't drive if you don't have to, say governors in Georgia, the Carolinas and Pennsylvania. They're asking people to conserve gas over the Labor Day weekend. Thousands of drivers are already complaining about price gouging. Well let the gouging begin, says economist and commentator Stephen Moore.