Marketplace PM for October 10, 2006

Episode Description 

Sprint chairman calls it quits

Sprint Nextel chairman Tim Donahue will leave his post at the end of the year. The move comes after a tough year for Sprint, but the company says Donahue is leaving voluntarily. Diantha Parker reports.

Investigating private-equity funds

The Justice Department has begun an inquiry into potentially anti-competitive behavior among leading private-equity funds. Information and documents related to deals and business practices have been requested. Ashley Milne-Tyte reports.
Posted In: Washington

DuPont's getting greener

One of the largest chemical companies in the world, DuPont today announced it is doubling its R&D investment in green products and setting new sales goals for eco-friendly products. Sarah Gardner reports.

China to invest abroad

Beijing's state pension fund is preparing to make its first investments abroad, putting up to $1 billion into foreign financial markets in an effort to improve returns on its reserves. Nancy Marshall Genzer reports.
Posted In: Canada

Mining town finds unlikely savior

Three years ago Eveleth, Minn. might have been heading for ghost town status when its bankrupt iron mine closed. And then a new wind blew through town, all the way from China. Bob Kelleher reports.

Buyout decision looms for Ford workers

Starting next week Ford's hourly employees must decide whether to accept a buyout offer. Today the automaker began conducting career fairs and workshops to help them weigh career options. Host Kai Ryssdal speaks to one of those employees.

Self-identity for sale

So Google buys YouTube for $1.6 billion — another opportunity to make gobs of money selling more ads to more eyeballs. But commentator and marketing expert Adam Hanft says something is being overlooked in the swirl of attention.

We've got mail

Host Kai Ryssdal goes through the mail bag and shares some letters from our listeners.

Putting India's kids out of work

Until today, it was legal in India to employ kids under age 14 in restaurants and as domestic servants. Human rights groups say the child workforce in India could number as high as 100 million. Miranda Kennedy reports.
Posted In: Canada