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Marketplace AM for July 24, 2006

Episode Description 

UK to crack down on fraud

The British government is planning to adopt a tough US-style approach to combating fraud and other large-scale financial crime. Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Canada

Just say no to earnings predictions

Today a big business group is calling on companies to stop giving Wall Street quarterly earnings expectations. Ashley Milne-Tyte reports.
Posted In: Wall Street

Doha Round talks collapse

The US, Europe and developing nations have been trying for five years to draft a global free trade agreement. Today those talks broke down. Host Scott Jagow asks British economist Sean Rickart, what's the problem?
Posted In: Canada

Sloan Sessions: Backdating explained

Host Scott Jagow talks to Newsweek Wall Street editor Allan Sloan about federal efforts to crack down on stock option backdating.
Posted In: Wall Street

Buying a new computer?

Most consumers consider factors like memory, processing speed and price when they buy a new PC. Now a new rating system ranks computers based on environmental factors. Alex Cohen has the story.
Posted In: Science

Big week for big oil

Earnings reports are due out for BP, Conoco-Phillips, ExxonMobil and other big oil companies this week. Lisa Napoli has this preview.
Posted In: Wall Street

Accessible hedge funds are here

A Swiss firm that invests in hedge funds began trading today on the London Stock Exchange, a move that gives rank-and-file investors access to the ultra-risky investments. Ashley Milne-Tyte reports.
Posted In: Investing

Cancer drug warning

New research shows a group of popular cancer drugs can increase risk of heart attack, but the findings may do little to dampen sales. Helen Palmer reports.
Posted In: Health

Fighting livestock registration

Vermont farmers are expected this week to sound off against a proposal to register all animals on livestock farms. They say it's just not feasible. Steve Tripoli reports.
Posted In: Washington

Drought plagues farmers

Searing temperatures this summer are leaving many farmers to face a drought in harvest-time income. Alex Cohen reports.