John Dimsdale has spent almost 40 years in radio. As head of Marketplace’s Washington, D.C., bureau, he provides insightful commentary on the intersection of government and money for the entire Marketplace portfolio.

As Dimsdale notes, “Sooner or later, every story in the world comes through Washington,” and reporting on those issues is like “… going to school with all the best professors and then reporting to listeners what I found out at the end of the day … Can you believe they pay me to do that?”

Dimsdale began working for Marketplace in 1990, when he opened the D.C. bureau. The next day, Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, triggering the first Gulf War, and Dimsdale has been busy ever since.

In his 20 years at Marketplace, Dimsdale has reported on two wars, the dot-com boom, the housing bust, healthcare reform and the greening of energy. His interviews with four U.S. Presidents, four Hall-of-Famers, broadcast journalist Walter Cronkite, computer scientist Sergey Brin, U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson and former U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey stand out as favorites. Some of his greatest contributions include a series on government land-use policies and later, a series on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal site.

Before joining Marketplace, Dimsdale worked at NPR, the Pennsylvania Public Television Network, Post-Newsweek Stations and Independent Network News.

A native of Washington, D.C., and the son of a federal government employee, Dimsdale has been passionate about public policy since the Vietnam War. He holds a bachelor’s degree in International Studies from Washington College in Chestertown, Md., and a master’s degree in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo.

Dimsdale and his wife, Claire, live in the suburb of Silver Spring, Md., and when not working, he enjoys traveling, carpentry, photography, videography, swimming and home brewing.

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Features by John Dimsdale

Pain at the pump

Washington bureau chief John Dimsdale discusses how rising gas prices are hurting consumers, enough to get the president's attention.
Posted In: gas prices, family budget, President Obama

Airlines pass higher fuel costs to passengers

Consumers are not only feeling the pinch of higher gas prices at the pump. They are also getting hit with higher plane tickets as airlines pass rising jet fuel costs to passengers.
Posted In: Airlines, airline prices, Travel, fuel, gas prices

Rising gas prices offset payroll tax savings

Consumer savings from the payroll tax cut, which lawmakers just voted to extend for another year, were erased by higher gasoline prices. The same scenario is likely this year.
Posted In: undefined

Key French bank slashes its Greek debt

BNP Paribas, France’s largest bank, cut the value of its Greek debt by 75 percent. Markets were fine. Does that offer a glimmer of hope in the crisis?
Posted In: BNP Paribas, greek bailout, Greek debt

New SEC settlement tests regulator's mettle

SEC settles fraud case with former Bear Stearns hedge fund managers. Despite public pressure, the SEC fails to wrest admissions of guilt.
Posted In: Bear Stearns, SEC, Securities and Exchange Commission

Greece adopts drastic austerity measures

Overnight, the Greek parliament imposed drastic cuts that will layoff some 150,000 government workers, raise the retirement age and lower the minimum wage by 20 percent. What would the same cutbacks feel like here in the U.S.?
Posted In: Greece, austerity, budget cuts

Bank settlement to bail out some underwater homeowners

Yesterday's $25 billion agreement between five big U.S. banks and state attorneys general could help some three million homeowners who owe more than their homes are currently worth.
Posted In: Housing, underwater mortgage, foreclosure, mortgage settlement

Senate weighs bigger government role in cyber security

Lawmakers are proposing increased government regulation of computer security for "critical" businesses like nuclear power plants, water utilities and chemical factories.
Posted In: cybersecurity, hackers

Jobs report brings rare good economic news

There was some good news from Washington for a change. For the second month in row, U.S. job creation rose, leading some to believe the economy might finally be showing signs of a sustained recovery. But there were some skeptics.
Posted In: Jobs, Unemployment

Required super PAC disclosures don't reveal all

Midnight was the filing deadline for "super" political action committees to reveal where all the big money flowing into the 2012 presidential campaigns is coming from. But still, it could be a while before we know the names of donors.
Posted In: super PAC, campaign contributions

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