What have you always wondered about the economy? Tell us
Workplace Culture

There’s a push to mandate hazard pay at the local level

Meghan McCarty Carino Jan 13, 2021
Heard on: Marketplace Morning Report
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Cashier Olga Jiminez, clad in mask and gloves, at work at Presidente Supermarket in Miami in April. Many companies that provided hazard pay early in the pandemic eventually phased it out. Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Workplace Culture

There’s a push to mandate hazard pay at the local level

Meghan McCarty Carino Jan 13, 2021
Cashier Olga Jiminez, clad in mask and gloves, at work at Presidente Supermarket in Miami in April. Many companies that provided hazard pay early in the pandemic eventually phased it out. Joe Raedle/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Susan Hernandez has been away from her job at a Food 4 Less grocery store in North Hollywood, California, for almost two months. In mid-November, she came down with COVID-19 and is still recovering.

“My scariest moments were at night when I couldn’t breathe,” she said. “It felt like there were sharp, icicle pains being shot into my lungs, and I just didn’t know if I was going to make it.”

She lives with her husband and two older children, who also fell ill. She’s convinced she contracted the virus at work, where she said a customer without a mask had yelled in her face just days before.

“Every day is a gamble for us. Every second is a gamble for us,” she said.

In the early months of the pandemic, that gamble was rewarded with a $2 per hour hazard-pay raise. Kroger, which owns Food 4 Less, discontinued extra pay in June, saying it’s committed to gradual and permanent pay raises. Hernandez, with her union, has been pushing to reinstate hazard pay.

With COVID-19 spreading out of control in many parts of the country, it’s never been riskier for essential, front-line workers to do their jobs. Yet many companies are no longer offering hazard pay. Local governments in Los Angeles County, the current epicenter of the pandemic, are the latest to move toward mandating that essential workers receive a pay bump.

L.A. has seen workplace spread of COVID-19 explode as the county has been hit with a tsunami of cases. Hundreds of employees at more than two dozen local retailers have been infected, despite some of the strictest public health measures in the country.

Angelica Hernandez works at an L.A. McDonald’s. She said workers there should get hazard pay because the jobs carry unavoidable risk, even with all the safety measures in place.

“We don’t have the space that we need to keep 6 feet” apart, she said. “Sometimes there are five or six of us in the kitchen, and we’re superclose.”

She said multiple colleagues have gotten sick, with one ending up on a ventilator. So she sent her children to stay with grandparents to avoid exposing them to the virus.

“There’s just anguishing choices that these workers have between their health, their family’s health and a paycheck,” said Molly Kinder, David M. Rubenstein fellow at the Brookings Institution.

She said about half of front-line workers are nonwhite and earn low wages. While many large companies have offered hazard-pay increases, the amounts and duration have been uneven.

“Some companies have been extremely generous and others have not,” she said.

Her research found Best Buy, Target and Costco had increased wages the most while Kroger, Walmart and Amazon had paid among the smallest bonuses, despite those companies earning billions of dollars in additional revenue during the pandemic.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What are the details of President Joe Biden’s coronavirus relief plan?

The $1.9 trillion plan would aim to speed up the vaccine rollout and provide financial help to individuals, states and local governments and businesses. Called the “American Rescue Plan,” the legislative proposal would meet Biden’s goal of administering 100 million vaccines by the 100th day of his administration, while advancing his objective of reopening most schools by the spring. It would also include $1,400 checks for most Americans. Get the rest of the specifics here.

What kind of help can small businesses get right now?

A new round of Paycheck Protection Program loans recently became available for pandemic-ravaged businesses. These loans don’t have to be paid back if rules are met. Right now, loans are open for first-time applicants. And the application has to go through community banking organizations — no big banks, for now, at least. This rollout is designed to help business owners who couldn’t get a PPP loan before.

What does the hiring situation in the U.S. look like as we enter the new year?

New data on job openings and postings provide a glimpse of what to expect in the job market in the coming weeks and months. This time of year typically sees a spike in hiring and job-search activity, says Jill Chapman with Insperity, a recruiting services firm. But that kind of optimistic planning for the future isn’t really the vibe these days. Job postings have been lagging on the job search site Indeed. Listings were down about 11% in December compared to a year earlier.

Read More

Collapse

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.