COVID-19

Remote workers pay cooling bills or sweat out summer heat at home

Meghan McCarty Carino Sep 7, 2020
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The sun sets behind power lines in Los Angeles, California, during the record-breaking heat wave over Labor Day weekend. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images
COVID-19

Remote workers pay cooling bills or sweat out summer heat at home

Meghan McCarty Carino Sep 7, 2020
Heard on:
The sun sets behind power lines in Los Angeles, California, during the record-breaking heat wave over Labor Day weekend. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images
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This Labor Day weekend brought a record-busting heat wave to much of the West. Los Angeles recorded its highest temperature ever, with part of the city reaching 121 degrees Sunday. It brings to a close what was a hotter than average summer across the country — one which many workers experienced from home instead of their aggressively temperature-controlled offices.

Anna Chen is among the legions of newly-remote employees adapting to work without industrial HVAC. The communications officer for Los Angeles County’s transit agency counts herself lucky to have air conditioning in her apartment. But she tries to save on electricity by toughing it out with fans until the late afternoon and setting the thermostat near 80 degrees when she does turn it on.

“I’m really cheap about some things,” she said. She’s taken to lying on her cool tile floor to work on her laptop and reminiscing about her frozen office.

“I usually have to keep a little cardigan or something there,” she said. “That is one of the things I think I really do miss.”

Tyler Knight, a product manager for an LA entertainment company, has been working in a studio attached to his garage, which he said heats up to about 85 degrees by mid-morning. He turns on his portable AC only when he gets really desperate, as his electricity bill has already shot up 25% over last year.

“There’s that moment late in the afternoon, where you’re already sort of dragging a little bit and the heat just doesn’t help,” he said.

An analysis by Riordan Frost, research analyst at Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies, found that electricity use has decreased overall during the pandemic, but residential energy use is up.

“So basically, there has been a transfer of burden from the commercial and industrial sectors to the residential sector,” Frost said.

And workers are — for the most part — paying for it themselves, said Jeffrey Ruzal, an employment law attorney at Epstein Becker Green in New York City.

“Most states actually do not have reimbursement requirements with respect to what employers have to pay to employees who work from home,” he said.

Some states like California and Illinois do have stricter laws requiring employers to reimburse employees for work expenses at home. Until now, those have mostly applied to things like cell phone bills or internet service, but he thinks the current situation could force a change.

“I think in the next few months, we are going to see a closer look by the courts and departments of labor and other agencies to see whether there should be consideration of air conditioning and other electricity usage for working-from-home scenarios,” he said.

Because as hard as it may be to imagine from a steamy home office now, a cold winter and its heating bills are just around the corner.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

Millions of Americans are unemployed, but businesses say they are having trouble hiring. Why?

This economic crisis is unusual compared to traditional recessions, according to Daniel Zhao, senior economist with Glassdoor. “Many workers are still sitting out of the labor force because of health concerns or child care needs, and that makes it tough to find workers regardless of what you’re doing with wages or benefits,” Zhao said. “An extra dollar an hour isn’t going to make a cashier with preexisting conditions feel that it’s safe to return to work.” This can be seen in the restaurant industry: Some workers have quit or are reluctant to apply because of COVID-19 concerns, low pay, meager benefits and the stress that comes with a fast-paced, demanding job. Restaurants have been willing to offer signing bonuses and temporary wage increases. One McDonald’s is even paying people $50 just to interview.

Could waiving patents increase the global supply of COVID-19 vaccines?

India and South Africa have introduced a proposal to temporarily suspend patents on COVID-19 vaccines. Backers of the plan say it would increase the supply of vaccines around the world by allowing more countries to produce them. Skeptics say it’s not that simple. There’s now enough supply in the U.S that any adult who wants a shot should be able to get one soon. That reality is years away for most other countries. More than 100 countries have backed the proposal to temporarily waive COVID-19 vaccine patents. The U.S isn’t one of them, but the White House has said it’s considering the idea.

Can businesses deny you entry if you don’t have a vaccine passport?

As more Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19 and the economy begins reopening, some businesses are requiring proof of vaccination to enter their premises. The concept of a vaccine passport has raised ethical questions about data privacy and potential discrimination against the unvaccinated. However, legal experts say businesses have the right to deny entrance to those who can’t show proof.

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