My Economy

Why a county historian closely watches the economy

Andie Corban Oct 14, 2019
HTML EMBED:
COPY
pxhere
My Economy

Why a county historian closely watches the economy

Andie Corban Oct 14, 2019
pxhere
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Ohio native Holly Kirkendall always loved history — she started working at her local museum when she was 15. Armed with a degree in public history, Kirkendall now works as the curator at the Wood County Historical Center and Museum. When she started working there, she was surprised to find out her job was just as much about budgeting and finance as it was about creating the museum’s exhibits.

Museum curator Holly Kirkendall. (Courtesy photo)

Even though Wood County’s museum is partially funded by the county and historical society, it’s often strapped for cash. As one of only four full-time staff members, Kirkendall is always worrying about the budget. She’s also watching financial trends, which impact who is coming through the museum doors each day.

“Our main admission is only $7,” she said, “and that’s actually pretty low for a museum. But if we are in an economic downturn, then even $7, people are going to question [spending] that.”

Click the audio player above to hear Kirkendall’s story.

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.