Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace

Gas prices, explained

Oct 18, 2019

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Corner Office from Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
This Is Uncomfortable
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

California gig worker law to be decided this week

Meghan McCarty Carino Sep 9, 2019
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Uber and Lyft drivers protest at Los Angeles International Airport over what they say are unfair wages.
Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

All eyes are on California this week as lawmakers face a final vote on Assembly Bill 5. It would reclassify many gig workers as employees, opening the door to guaranteed benefits and protections like health care, workers’ compensation and the right to form a union.

Gov. Gavin Newsom has said he supports the bill and the state’s Democratic majority looks poised to pass it.

California is the birthplace of the modern gig economy, home to Uber, Lyft and a slew of similarly disruptive companies.

“They have built a business model based on far fewer benefits for workers,” said UC Berkeley labor expert Harley Shaiken. AB-5, he said, seeks to correct that and has been supported by the state’s major labor unions.

But the companies say making drivers employees will result in less flexibility and higher consumer prices. Uber, Lyft and DoorDash are putting $90 million behind a ballot measure to oppose the law.

And Silicon Valley techies aren’t the only ones upset. The law could affect everyone from manicurists to newspaper deliverers and truck drivers.

Last week independent truckers protested near the state Capitol. Joe Rajkovacz with the Western States Trucking Association said drivers who own their truck as a small business could get squeezed out.

“This law directly affects the ability of that individual to even exist in the marketplace,” he said.

A vote on the bill could come as soon as Tuesday, and it looks poised to win approval.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.

Check Your Balance ™️
Check Your Balance ™️
Personal finance from Marketplace. Where the economy, your personal life and money meet.

Thank you to all the donors who made our fall drive a success!

It’s Investors like you that keep Marketplace going strong!