What have you always wondered about the economy? Tell us
COVID-19

During the pandemic, women are less likely to ask for raises and promotions

Mitchell Hartman Mar 8, 2021
Heard on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
A new Indeed survey conducted in December finds that women, who were already more reluctant than men to push for higher pay and better jobs, are now even less likely to advocate for themselves. Brothers91 via Getty Images
COVID-19

During the pandemic, women are less likely to ask for raises and promotions

Mitchell Hartman Mar 8, 2021
Heard on:
A new Indeed survey conducted in December finds that women, who were already more reluctant than men to push for higher pay and better jobs, are now even less likely to advocate for themselves. Brothers91 via Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

International Women’s Day is a fitting time to acknowledge that the pandemic has been a very difficult time for women as workers, wage-earners and caregivers. 

Women’s labor force participation has fallen to a more-than-30-year low as millions of women have been laid off, or quit to care for family members. Women’s child care and home-schooling duties have risen more than men, up more than six hours a day.

A new Indeed survey conducted in December finds that during the pandemic, women are less likely than men to ask for higher pay or promotions. The Indeed Hiring Lab surveyed women and men about how willing they are to approach their boss for a raise or promotion. (Full disclosure: Indeed is a “Marketplace Morning Report” underwriter.)

“Women, now during the pandemic, were less likely than men to feel comfortable asking for those types of benefits,” said Indeed economist AnnElizabeth Konkel, author of the report.

In particular, Konkel said, mid-career women in their 30s, 40s and 50s reported feeling especially overwhelmed with family responsibilities.

“Women may be feeling that they aren’t able to put in 100% at work right now,” she said. “And given that women often feel they have to over-perform so that they can ask for that pay raise or promotion, they’re just not comfortable having that conversation with their boss.”

And while working from home is better than being out of work, all that isolation makes things more difficult, said Leigh Thompson, a professor of management and organizations at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University who specializes in negotiation.

“We don’t have a lot of those impromptu meetings for not only building cohesion, but acting as sounding boards and mentors for one another,” Thompson said.

She said that is the type of personal support women typically rely on to help them advocate for the advancement of their careers.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

Can businesses deny you entry if you don’t have a vaccine passport?

As more Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19 and the economy begins reopening, some businesses are requiring proof of vaccination to enter their premises. The concept of a vaccine passport has raised ethical questions about data privacy and potential discrimination against the unvaccinated. However, legal experts say businesses have the right to deny entrance to those who can’t show proof.

Give me a snapshot of the labor market in the U.S.

U.S. job openings in February increased more than expected, according to the Labor Department. Also, the economy added over 900,000 jobs in March. For all of the good jobs news recently, there are still nearly 10 million people who are out of work, and more than 4 million of them have been unemployed for six months or longer. “So we still have a very long way to go until we get a full recovery,” said Elise Gould with the Economic Policy Institute. She said the industries that have the furthest to go are the ones you’d expect: “leisure and hospitality, accommodations, food services, restaurants” and the public sector, especially in education.

What do I need to know about tax season this year?

Glad you asked! We have a whole separate FAQ section on that. Some quick hits: The deadline has been extended from April 15 to May 17 for individuals. Also, millions of people received unemployment benefits in 2020 — up to $10,200 of which will now be tax-free for those with an adjusted gross income of less than $150,000. And, for those who filed before the American Rescue Plan passed, simply put, you do not need to file an amended return at the moment. Find answers to the rest of your questions here.

Read More

Collapse

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.