United States of Work

How one hairstylist is preparing to get back to work

Kai Ryssdal and Maria Hollenhorst May 12, 2020
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Ashley Nelson, a hair stylist in Boise, Idaho, hasn't taken an appointment since mid-March. Arlie Sommer
United States of Work

How one hairstylist is preparing to get back to work

Kai Ryssdal and Maria Hollenhorst May 12, 2020
Heard on:
Ashley Nelson, a hair stylist in Boise, Idaho, hasn't taken an appointment since mid-March. Arlie Sommer
HTML EMBED:
COPY

As states begin to reopen their economies, some people who’ve lost their jobs amid the coronavirus crisis are preparing to start work again.

“I have a few weeks booked out already,” Idaho hairstylist Ashley Nelson told “Marketplace” host Kai Ryssdal. “I definitely think people are very eager to get their hair done.”

Idaho is one of the states beginning to reopen its economy. Starting May 16, the state government hopes to allow restaurants, gyms and hair salons to open if they’re able to follow certain safety procedures. 

“I have decided to go into a private suite where I will basically create another layer of comfort for my clients so that we’re just alone in a room that can be sanitized very well between each client,” Nelson said. 

In the meantime, she’s getting back in touch with clients.

“I had about 170 people I had to get in contact with,” she said. “Hopefully, people are being loyal to their [hairstylists], and not just bopping around and trying to find someone who can get them in sooner.”

Click the audio player above to hear the interview. 

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