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How immigrant entrepreneurs get their start in the U.S. economy

David Wagner Jul 4, 2019
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Iririn Srirada, the owner of Thai food stall So Zaap, at the East Hollywood Farmer's Market on Hollywood Boulevard.
James Bernal for KPCC

Some immigrants struggle to transfer their degrees or skills into a new country, so they decide to become their own boss. A Harvard Business School study found about 25% of all new businesses in the U.S. are started by immigrants. In East Hollywood, a growing community of Thai business owners are contributing to the trend.

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