Americans passengers worry about Boeing after crash

Marielle Segarra Mar 11, 2019
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A LEAP engine is pictured on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on Dec. 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Americans passengers worry about Boeing after crash

Marielle Segarra Mar 11, 2019
A LEAP engine is pictured on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on Dec. 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
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The fatal crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 is prompting some Americans to establish whether their upcoming flights are on a Boeing 737 Max 8, the same kind of jet that crashed Sunday. Two U.S. carriers operate that type of plane — Southwest Airlines and American Airlines — and both are standing behind the safety of their fleet and have chosen not to ground the 737 Max 8s they operate. Some aviation experts agree with this assessment, saying that until there’s a full investigation into both the Ethiopian crash and the previous 737 Max 8 crash into the Java Sea last fall, there’s no reason not to fly the jet.

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