The reality of a massive security breach

Kai Ryssdal and Bennett Purser Jul 30, 2019
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The Capital One headquarters as seen in 2006 in Mclean, Virginia. Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The reality of a massive security breach

Kai Ryssdal and Bennett Purser Jul 30, 2019
The Capital One headquarters as seen in 2006 in Mclean, Virginia. Mark Wilson/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

The personal data of more than 100 million people was compromised at Capital One Financial, when a hacker accessed credit cards applications dating back to 2005.

It’s the latest of many high-profile hacks affecting companies like Target and Equifax, and even the federal government’s Office of Personnel Management.

The news got us thinking: What are the odds that your personal information have fallen into the hands of hackers?

Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal did the math with Richard De Veaux, chair of the department of mathematics and statistics at Williams College. De Veaux also serves as the vice president of the American Statistical Association.

Click the audio player above to hear the interview.

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